• Gay penguin story on list of disputed library books
    A picture book about two male penguins raising a baby penguin has again made a list of books to have received the most complaints from library users.
    And Tango Makes Three came third in a list of titles the American Library Association said had received the most complaints from parents and educators.
    The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian came top of the list.
    Sherman Alexie's tale of a young Native American at a predominantly white high school was first published in 2007.

    'Real-life story'

    Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, a graphic novel about a young Iranian girl growing up in the years after the country's Islamic Revolution, is ranked second.
    The list of titles, all of which have been the subject of a formal written complaint, filed with a library or school, requesting they be removed, is compiled annually by the ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom.
    The alleged "cultural insensitivity" of Alexie's novel is one of the reasons cited in complaints calling for its removal.
    And Tango Makes Three - based on a real-life story of two male penguins who hatched an egg at the New York Zoo - is accused of promoting a homosexual agenda.
    Other titles on the list include Toni Morrison's debut novel The Bluest Eye, The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini and A Stolen Life, a kidnapping memoir by Jaycee Dugard.
    The ALA counted 311 challenges in 2014, roughly the same as were lodged in 2013.
    Source: Penguin

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  • Rights groups welcome release of Chinese women activists
    Rights groups have welcomed China's release of five activists who were held for more than a month, saying it was driven by an international outcry.
    The women, who had planned protests against sexual harassment, were detained shortly before International Women's Day on 8 March.
    The US, UK and European Union had all called for their release.
    The five have not been charged but their bail conditions mean charges could be brought at a later date.
    Their lawyer, Liang Xiaojun, said they would need to regularly update the authorities on their whereabouts.
    Human Rights Watch's Maya Wang said on Twitter that their release "shows international pressure works on China, when it is strong enough", and that the authorities should "cease harassment".
    Amnesty International's William Nee said in a statement that the release was "an encouraging breakthrough", but that "the authorities must now follow through and drop all charges and restrictions against the women".
    Lu Jun, the co-founder of Chinese campaign group Yirenping - which some of the women were involved with - said their detention was "a glaring injustice", but that advocacy for the release has "actually furthered legal protection of women's rights and strengthened the rule of law in China".
    Analysis, Celia Hatton, Beijing
    Chinese authorities waited until the last possible moment to release the so-called Beijing Five from detention. Just hours before they were legally mandated to press ahead with a formal case, or release the women, prosecutors elected not to move forward with the recommended charges of "picking quarrels and provoking trouble".
    The women, now free on bail, will remain under police surveillance. The activists are part of China's Women's Rights Action Group, a loose network of volunteers who organise events promoting gender equality.
    Many see the women's high-profile arrests as a red light warning to civil rights groups across China to scale down their activities.
    This year's International Women's Day coincided with China's annual parliamentary session, which usually has tight security and is often preceded by the detention of activists.
    The women had planned activities including a march in a Beijing park where participants would wear stickers advocating safe sex, and gatherings in Beijing and Guangzhou calling for awareness of sexual harassment on buses.
    China said on Monday it had lodged a formal complaint to the US over a statement by Secretary of State John Kerry at the weekend in which he called for their unconditional release.

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  • Does Russian-language Siri have a problem with gays?
    When a Russian speaker tried to chat to Apple's virtual assistant Siri about gay clubs, he got an unusual response - which Apple maintains was due to a bug.
    video posted earlier this week showing a conversation in Russian between Siri and a man who identifies himself as Alex has now been widely shared on YouTube and Reddit. Here's a translation:
    Alex: "Siri, gay clubs around me?
    Siri: "I would have turned red (blushed) if I could."
    Alex: "How to register a gay marriage in the UK?"
    Siri: [Silence]
    Alex: "How to register a gay marriage in the UK?"
    Siri: "I will pretend I haven't heard it."
    You get the idea.
    Apple says Siri's responses were the result of a bug that has since been fixed. But the online discussion in English reflected the fact that gay rights and homophobia in Russia are now an issue very much discussed in the outside world. There was an assumption that Siri had been deliberately set up this way to comply with Russian law. "Apple is required to conform to the law of the land in order to sell devices in a place. Recognizing that is realism, not cynicism," said one Reddit user. Comments in Russian were much more angry in tone - some homophobic and others questioning Western interest in the subject.
    Alex, who's originally from Russia but now lives in the UK, told BBC Trending that he discovered Russian Siri's "attitude" by accident. "I was out with friends who'd updated their phones to the latest version of iOS," he said. "Russian Siri was one of the new features available. So we made queries using the word 'gay' and got very weird replies. We also got similar responses with the word 'lesbian'," he says.
    A BBC Russian team asked Siri similar questions and got the same response. You can read their article about it (in Russian) here.
    Gay rights are a contentious subject in Russia, after a law banning gay "propaganda" was passed in 2013. It prohibits people from giving information about homosexuality to those under 18.
    "I can understand if a company needs to adapt to the legislation of a country," says Alex. "Apple fixed it. But there hasn't been an explanation as to how it happened in the first place."

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  • View point: ‘Coming Out’: It’s not easy being green … or being gay Do you remember Kermit the Frog from The Muppet Show and his signature song, “It’s Not Easy Being Green”? 

    He laments his coloration: He thinks green is boring because it “blends in with so many ordinary things”. He wishes he could have been red, yellow or gold, “or something much more colorful like that”.

    Members of the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) community probably envy Kermit’s “predicament”, as they are all too often labeled abnormal, unnatural, immoral, different, deviant, dangerous — even a scourge to society. 

    At least Kermit should be happy that he’s never had a religious fatwa (Islamic edict) issued against him proposing the death penalty for being green, amphibian or having webbed feet, i.e. being a frog. Imagine!

    Absurd, isn’t it? To criminalize and punish someone for being what and who they are? But this is precisely what the Indonesian Ulema Council (MUI) has done. 

    On Dec. 31, 2014, they issued a fatwa (No. 57/2014 on lesbians, gays, sodomy and immoral behavior) that stigmatizes same-sex behavior. They recommend punishment up to the death penalty and have urged the government not to allow lesbians, gays and bisexuals to organize. 

    Announcing the edict publicly on March 3, Hasanuddin AF, head of MUI’s fatwa commission, said it was issued because sexual deviance was on the rise. It had infiltrated schools and would hurt “national morale”. He called on the government to set up rehabilitation centers to “cure” LGBT people and eradicate homosexuality. 

    Sigh. Another case of MUI moral panic. Don’t they have anything better to do? How about cracking down on sexual deviance in their midst, e.g. the kiai and ustad (religious teachers) who sexually molest and/or sodomize their students? Homosexuality is virtually institutionalized in pesantren (religious boarding schools) anyhow — isn’t MUI being a tad hypocritical?

    I reckon the government would do better to set up a rehabilitation center to cure people like Hasa-nuddin of their (religious) bigotry and dangerous ignorance. 

    Hasn’t the MUI heard that the World Health Organization, the Health Ministry and all major mental health organizations worldwide no longer consider homosexuality a mental disorder? It’s simply a variation in sexual orientation. As Alfred C. Kinsey (1894-1956), the famous American sexologist said: “The only unnatural sex act is that which you cannot perform.”

    LGBT and human rights activists, not just in Indonesia, but also internationally, were quick to condemn MUI’s fatwa. Rightly so. You’d expect that wouldn’t you?

    Interestingly, 13 days after the MUI issued the fatwa, on March 16, a book called Coming Out addressing the issue of being gay in Indonesia, was published by Kepustakaan Populer Gramedia (KPG).

    The author, Hendri Yulius, a 26-year-old scholar, researcher, writer, author and LGBT activist, is a very impressive young man who is as intelligent, well-read, and dedicated as he is talented. A prolific writer, he’s published more than 10 books on a range of topics and many articles in various journals. Ten books at age 26? Now that makes me jealous!

    I first met Hendri when he came to interview me about two years ago for an academic assignment. He was then 24, still a student at Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore (NUS). 

    It didn’t take me long to be impressed by Hendri’s intelligence, knowledge and pleasant, engaging personality. At NUS, he took four other minor topics on films and sexuality. He told me he’s been interested in gender and sexuality since he was a teenager and is basically self-taught.

    Before Coming Out, in 2013 he had published Lilith’s Bible, his collection of feminist horror short stories. Feminist horror? Yes, you read right. 

    So given his background, it’s not surprising that Coming Out is an expression of so many things about the author. It’s about his personal journey, his scholarly bent (sic !), his research capability, his literary inclinations, and of course, his passion for the truth and justice. 

    The book is a very informative and fascinating read. It contains, among others, the history and traditional practice of homosexuality in Indonesia; analysis of the biological basis of homosexuality; discussions of bio-politics and the nation-state and highlights academic debates on homosexuality. 

    It addresses issues around homosexuality and the military; marriage (both heterosexual and same-sex); homosexuality in Indonesian literature, films and pop culture; and of course, the vexed connection between homosexuality with faith and religion. 

    Most importantly, Coming Out debunks and deconstructs myths and misconceptions about homosexuality and sexuality in general. 

    As Hendri points out in his book, historically and universally, homosexuality has been condemned, maligned and misunderstood. 

    This is strange, given that about 10 percent of people in any given society are gay.

    Why is love between two men considered taboo, he asks, but blood, gore and killing are considered entertaining, sellable commodities? Go figure.

    Given the ignorance not just of the MUI, but also the general public on LGBT issues, Coming Out should be required reading for everyone, especially MUI members.

    What happens if we juxtapose the MUI’s fatwa with Hendri’s book? We see the personification of Indonesia’s past and future. The MUI and their fatwa trigger-happy ways belong to the past; Hendri’s knowledge-packed book, with a big dose of heart and compassion, belongs to Indonesia’s future. 

    Hendri’s triple-minority status (gay, Christian and ethnic-Chinese) represents Indonesia’s democratic pluralism, while MUI’s restrictive, judgmental, condemning, outdated, ignorant, moralistic way belong to Indonesia’s authoritarian past. 

    Who would you choose? Hendri or the MUI? It’s a no-brainer, right?

    But let’s not forget our friend Kermit. If he wants to be more colorful, then he should join the LGBT Rainbow Coalition, which is not just a celebration of LGBT, but of pluralism, diversity and the human spirit. 

    But guess what? Indonesia already has its Rainbow Coalition: it’s called Bhinneka Tunggal Ika (Unity in Diversity), our national motto. Hurray!!

    Source: Green

    more
  • The myths about gay sex
    GSN reclines on the counselor’s couch to talk about gay men's sex lives

    Quiet, considered and thoughtful, Nicholas Rose is not perhaps the first person I would have thought of to talk about sex with.
    Rose is a counselor and psychotherapist who specializes in working with gay men and gay couples, and it’s clear that not much surprises him when it comes to talking about the complex and sometimes tricky subject of sex.
    Why is sex such a big deal?
    In all relationship counseling the sex act is a vital and central kind of spotlight on the nature of the relationship.
    What happens in bed often reflects the wider relationship - so issues around power and control, or who pleases who, can manifest in the sex act and impact the satisfaction of the couple in their sex life.
    What is it about gay relationships or sexual encounters that mean that we often self-categorize in relation to our sexual preferences? A quick scan of dating apps like Grindr suggest gay men have at some stage had an encounter with a Harry Potter-esque sorting hat - ‘Top’; ‘Bottom’; ‘Versatile’.
    The sexual roles adopted by gay men in the sex act attract a lot of mythology.
    While for some men there may be a physiological element in relation to the amount of pleasure that can be achieved through anal sex, for most people the self-categorization into sexual roles stems primarily from expectations, assumptions, or fantasies about what is sexy and what isn’t.
    Mythology and perceptions can be quite unhelpful - for example some of the misconceptions around someone who identifies themselves as a bottom can cause shame, low self-esteem and low self-confidence, when actually, when it’s talked through, that person can realize that they are more powerful with others than they first realized.
    So these are perceptions we build over time? What if you feel like trying something different?
    This can often be a source of conflict within relationships. We change all the time - the most marked examples of this may be someone who is very low in confidence or self-esteem and may therefore allow others who are more experienced to take the lead, but over time, as confidence and experience builds, wants to take a more active role in the sex act. Conflict arises if one partner wants to change the role that they play and the other does not.
    As a therapist I always think it’s unhelpful to fix oneself as something which can be labelled because we do change as we grow older. We call it sedimentation - we don’t think sedimentation (or becoming stagnant) is helpful as we live in a changing environment, as our context changes we need to adapt and change in order to survive.
    What’s the best way to try to negotiate some of these challenges within a relationship?
    The complexity in this is that for many people, the sex act is not just a sexual encounter, it’s a means of intimacy.
    Start by asking yourself some questions: What is it that happens when you have sex? What do you do? How is it initiated? What roles do you play? What positions do you take? What do you like? What don’t you like? What does sex mean for you?
    Think about how you have sex as a couple: Are you a pleaser or someone who wants to please? Who does what for who when you’re having sex? Is there a connection between how you are in your sex life and the relationship generally? What are the parallels? Are you happy with that? Is that what you want?
    If some of the answers to those questions indicate that you may have a problem in the relationship because of issues within the sex life, how do you start to tackle that?
    The most important thing is to be able to talk about it openly. Effective dialogue between the couple will enable the issues to be revealed and then worked on.
    For example, if one of the couple wants to have sex seven days a week, then what is a workable solution? How is that negotiated?
    Of course sex isn’t everything, but it’s one of the main pillars of the relationship.
    I personally find it difficult to talk about sex with a partner or someone I’m dating. Maybe it’s a confidence thing, I get a bit embarrassed when someone asks me what I like in bed - I generally just answer ‘everything!’ I’m guessing that’s the wrong approach?
    Talking about sex can be uncomfortable - sex is when you’re at your most intimate and most vulnerable, it involves trust, safety, shared experiences, affirmation, and it’s a fundamental building block of the relationship.
    You may feel ashamed for wanting something more, less or different. If that is then causing issues within your relationship, counseling can help to enable you to discuss your sex life explicitly but neutrally.
    The main thing to remember is that a relationship is co-created and the important thing is that both sides are happy in it and that there is a working compromise and that there are no rights or roles.
    Ideally these conversations should take place at the start of the relationship so that you’re then building on strong foundations.
    Psychological research indicates that it takes half the time to get over a failed relationship as of the length of the relationship itself - so if you were together for four years it will take you two years to ‘get over’ the end of the relationship. Investing in your relationship is a form of self-protection.
    One of the areas that often seems to lead to conflict in relationships is when one partner wants to open the relationship so that it is no longer monogamous or exclusive. Is that something you see a lot of in counseling?

    If one partner is wanting to change the rules of the relationship, it’s important to discuss what is wrong with the sex life at the moment? How is there a conflict in the relationship around this issue? Often it may that the one that wants to open the relationship has reached a point of frustration about not getting what they need from the partnership.
    Source: Gay Sex

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  • View point: ‘Coming Out’: It’s not easy being green … or being gay Do you remember Kermit the Frog from The Muppet Show and his signature song, “It’s Not Easy Being Green”? 

    He laments his coloration: He thinks green is boring because it “blends in with so many ordinary things”. He wishes he could have been red, yellow or gold, “or something much more colorful like that”.

    Members of the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) community probably envy Kermit’s “predicament”, as they are all too often labeled abnormal, unnatural, immoral, different, deviant, dangerous — even a scourge to society. 

    At least Kermit should be happy that he’s never had a religious fatwa (Islamic edict) issued against him proposing the death penalty for being green, amphibian or having webbed feet, i.e. being a frog. Imagine!

    Absurd, isn’t it? To criminalize and punish someone for being what and who they are? But this is precisely what the Indonesian Ulema Council (MUI) has done. 

    On Dec. 31, 2014, they issued a fatwa (No. 57/2014 on lesbians, gays, sodomy and immoral behavior) that stigmatizes same-sex behavior. They recommend punishment up to the death penalty and have urged the government not to allow lesbians, gays and bisexuals to organize. 

    Announcing the edict publicly on March 3, Hasanuddin AF, head of MUI’s fatwa commission, said it was issued because sexual deviance was on the rise. It had infiltrated schools and would hurt “national morale”. He called on the government to set up rehabilitation centers to “cure” LGBT people and eradicate homosexuality. 

    Sigh. Another case of MUI moral panic. Don’t they have anything better to do? How about cracking down on sexual deviance in their midst, e.g. the kiai and ustad (religious teachers) who sexually molest and/or sodomize their students? Homosexuality is virtually institutionalized in pesantren (religious boarding schools) anyhow — isn’t MUI being a tad hypocritical?

    I reckon the government would do better to set up a rehabilitation center to cure people like Hasa-nuddin of their (religious) bigotry and dangerous ignorance. 

    Hasn’t the MUI heard that the World Health Organization, the Health Ministry and all major mental health organizations worldwide no longer consider homosexuality a mental disorder? It’s simply a variation in sexual orientation. As Alfred C. Kinsey (1894-1956), the famous American sexologist said: “The only unnatural sex act is that which you cannot perform.”

    LGBT and human rights activists, not just in Indonesia, but also internationally, were quick to condemn MUI’s fatwa. Rightly so. You’d expect that wouldn’t you?

    Interestingly, 13 days after the MUI issued the fatwa, on March 16, a book called Coming Out addressing the issue of being gay in Indonesia, was published by Kepustakaan Populer Gramedia (KPG).

    The author, Hendri Yulius, a 26-year-old scholar, researcher, writer, author and LGBT activist, is a very impressive young man who is as intelligent, well-read, and dedicated as he is talented. A prolific writer, he’s published more than 10 books on a range of topics and many articles in various journals. Ten books at age 26? Now that makes me jealous!

    I first met Hendri when he came to interview me about two years ago for an academic assignment. He was then 24, still a student at Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore (NUS). 

    It didn’t take me long to be impressed by Hendri’s intelligence, knowledge and pleasant, engaging personality. At NUS, he took four other minor topics on films and sexuality. He told me he’s been interested in gender and sexuality since he was a teenager and is basically self-taught.

    Before Coming Out, in 2013 he had published Lilith’s Bible, his collection of feminist horror short stories. Feminist horror? Yes, you read right. 

    So given his background, it’s not surprising that Coming Out is an expression of so many things about the author. It’s about his personal journey, his scholarly bent (sic !), his research capability, his literary inclinations, and of course, his passion for the truth and justice. 

    The book is a very informative and fascinating read. It contains, among others, the history and traditional practice of homosexuality in Indonesia; analysis of the biological basis of homosexuality; discussions of bio-politics and the nation-state and highlights academic debates on homosexuality. 

    It addresses issues around homosexuality and the military; marriage (both heterosexual and same-sex); homosexuality in Indonesian literature, films and pop culture; and of course, the vexed connection between homosexuality with faith and religion. 

    Most importantly, Coming Out debunks and deconstructs myths and misconceptions about homosexuality and sexuality in general. 

    As Hendri points out in his book, historically and universally, homosexuality has been condemned, maligned and misunderstood. 

    This is strange, given that about 10 percent of people in any given society are gay.

    Why is love between two men considered taboo, he asks, but blood, gore and killing are considered entertaining, sellable commodities? Go figure.

    Given the ignorance not just of the MUI, but also the general public on LGBT issues, Coming Out should be required reading for everyone, especially MUI members.

    What happens if we juxtapose the MUI’s fatwa with Hendri’s book? We see the personification of Indonesia’s past and future. The MUI and their fatwa trigger-happy ways belong to the past; Hendri’s knowledge-packed book, with a big dose of heart and compassion, belongs to Indonesia’s future. 

    Hendri’s triple-minority status (gay, Christian and ethnic-Chinese) represents Indonesia’s democratic pluralism, while MUI’s restrictive, judgmental, condemning, outdated, ignorant, moralistic way belong to Indonesia’s authoritarian past. 

    Who would you choose? Hendri or the MUI? It’s a no-brainer, right?

    But let’s not forget our friend Kermit. If he wants to be more colorful, then he should join the LGBT Rainbow Coalition, which is not just a celebration of LGBT, but of pluralism, diversity and the human spirit. 

    But guess what? Indonesia already has its Rainbow Coalition: it’s called Bhinneka Tunggal Ika (Unity in Diversity), our national motto. Hurray!

    Source: Green

    more
  • World’s Most Progressive Gender Identity Law Passes In Europe “The act is a beacon of hope,” said an European LGBT leader in response to the law passed Wednesday in the Malta, whose Constitution officially deems the country Catholic.



    The Mediterranean country of Malta adopted the world’s most progressive gender identity law on Wednesday in a final vote by the country’s parliament on Wednesday.
    The law is the latest in a series of LGBT rights laws ushered in by the Labour Party after taking power in 2013, a dramatic about-face for the country which has aconstitution establishing Catholicism as the official religion.
    Catholic teachings have long held great influence over Maltese family law; Malta was among the last countries in the world to approve to divorce, which voters did by a narrow referendum in 2011. (The vote left the Philippines and the Vatican as the world’s only countries with no provisions for divorce.)
    The law — which goes beyond those its fellow European Union members have passed — would allow for someone to change their legal gender through simply filing an affidavit with a notary without a significant waiting period, eliminates any requirement for medical gender reassignment procedures, and prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender identity. It now heads to the desk of President Marie-Louise Coleiro Preca, and LGBT rights advocates expect her to sign.
    It also includes some groundbreaking provisions for minors and intersex babies, those born without clearly male or female anatomy. Medical experts estimate that around .1 - .2 percent of children are born with atypical genitals that cannot be classified as either male or female, and in much of the world doctors operate on these children to make their anatomy clearly male or female.
    But the Maltese law prohibits “non-medically necessary treatments on the sex characteristics of a person” without informed consent and also allows parents to postpone entering a gender marker on a child’s birth certificate.
    “The Government of Malta has put LGBTIQ equality firmly on its agenda and is keen on putting in place the right legislative and policy framework,” Silvan Agius, policy coordinator for Human Rights in Malta’s Ministry for Social Dialogue, Consumer Affairs, and Civil Liberties. This was part of the Labour Party’s campaign platform, he noted, and the government formed an “LGBTIQ Consultative Council” with human rights organizations to help them craft legislation.
    One of the current government’s first acts upon taking office in 2013 was settling a seven-year human rights lawsuit brought by a trans woman who was being denied the right to marry her male partner. Maltese courts ruled she was not legally considered female, despite having successfully changed her gender on identity documents and there was no provision for same-sex marriage under Maltese law. In addition to the 2014 civil union law — which provides all the legal rights of marriage — the government also ushered through an amendment making Malta the first European country to ban discrimination on the basis of gender identity in its constitution.
    “To say that this Act is a groundbreaking human rights milestone is almost an understatement,” said the co-chair of the European branch of the International Lesbian and Gay Association, Paulo CĂ´rte-Real, in a statement issued following the vote. “It provides an inspirational benchmark for other European countries that need to improve their own LGBTI equality standards. The Act is a beacon of hope — and bears testament to the political leadership and hard work of the LGBTI movement in Malta.”
    The Catholic hierarchy, which fought the 2011 divorce referendum so aggressively that its leaders felt obliged to apologize for the tone of their campaign, appeared to have kept a low-profile ahead of the vote. It issued “comments and concerns” about the bill in December that objected to enshrining what it described as “gender ideology according to which people can freely determine whether they want to be male or female and freely choose their sexual orientation arbitrarily.” But it did so only after praising steps to create a “a ‘culture of dignity’ in which every citizen, irrespective of nationality, status, sexual orientation, gender, age or achievement, lives in an inclusive culture of recognition between human beings” and said that “those experiencing issues related to their gender identity” have “a right to equality and should not suffer any form of discrimination, stigmatization and marginalization.”

    The Maltese archdiocese has not issued any press statements about the bill since then, according to the media page of its website. The archdiocese did not respond to BuzzFeed News’s request for comment on Wednesday.
    Source: Europe

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  • French MPs back ban on skinny catwalk models

    French MPs have approved a law to ban the use of fashion models deemed to be excessively thin.
    Under the law, models will have to show they have a Body Mass Index (BMI) above a certain level.
    Modelling agents that break the rules face fines and six months in jail.
    The lower house of parliament also passed a separate measure making it illegal to condone anorexia, a move targeting internet sites that encourage dangerous weight loss.
    Up to an estimated 40,000 people suffer from anorexia in France, nine out of 10 of them women and girls.

    Unnatural thinness

    The new law on fashion models, part of a wider Health Bill, won a majority vote in the National Assembly lower house of parliament on Friday and must now be approved by the Senate.
    "Anyone whose body mass index... is below a certain level will not be able to work as a catwalk model," it said.
    The move would allow agencies to be "severely punished" if they forced models to undergo excessive weight loss, endangering their health, Olivier Veran, the Socialist MP who proposed the bill, told French news channel BFMTV.
    He has said there would be regular checks to enforce the rule.

    The deputy previously said models would have to present a medical certificate showing a BMI - the ratio of height to weight - of at least 18 before being hired for a job.
    The average BMI for a woman in France is said to be 23.2.
    Doctors say a normal BMI for adults is between 18.5 and 24.9, but some critics say the measure is not the best way of judging a healthy weight.
    The National Union of Modelling Agencies has complained the ban would affect the competitiveness of French modelling.
    But doctors and women's rights groups have long campaigned against the image they say is too often put out by the fashion industry of young women of an unnatural and unhealthy thinness, says the BBC's Hugh Schofield in Paris.
    In 2007, Isabelle Caro, an anorexic 28-year-old former French fashion model,posed for a photographic campaign to raise awareness about the illness - she died three years later.
    Source: French

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